Thor; the Norse god of thunder

May 03, 2019 2 min read

Thor is basically the Norse god of thunder, agriculture and the sky. He is the son of the chief of Gods, Odin, and Odin's group Jord (Earth) as well as husband of the fertility goddess called Sif, who is also the mother of his son Modi and even the daughter Thrud; the other son of Thor, Magni, has been suspected to be the descendant of a unification of the giantess Jarnsaxa. Thor is actually the defender of Asgard, which is the kingdom of the gods, and Midgard, the human kingdom, and is chiefly related with protection through great achievements of weapons in killing giants.

Thor God of Thunder in Norse Mythology Vs. Thor depicted in Marvel's Cinematic Universe:

According to the Marvel series, their version of Thor is a blond man who is often clean-shaved and converses in Shakespearean speech, using terms like “thee” and “thou.” However, it may come as a surprise but the god of the ancient Norseman never really did converse in English at all. The real mythical version of Thor also differed in other ways. He was red-headed and was never clean-shaved. He always had his beard on and gloried in encounter to the point where the Thor from the Marvel’s Series might have considered him as a supervillain too.

The Norse Thor required magic gloves so as to have Mjonir fly to him again. He also used a special belt to utilize Mjolnir at its full control. Even though, the Marvel Series made use of the special belt in the other universe known as the “Ultimates” comics, the gloves have never really been mentioned in the typical Marvel Universe at all. In addition to all of the above, it is an important difference that the original Thor could never fly on his own except with the help of his chariot which was drawn by goats called Toothgrinder and Toothgnasher, which have been seen in these comics so many times. However, Thor mostly flies by flinging his hammer around the whole place. Also, not to forget, the Thor from the Marvel’s Series, preserves his love for the human namely, Jane Foster, but in the Norse mythology, he actually gets married to the warrior goddess called Sif. And of course, unlike the myth version of Thor, Thor never really was penalized by Odin to walk across earth as the doctor Donald Blake.

Conclusion:

It has often left people in a state of shock when they learn that Jack Kirby and Stan Lee did not do really do such an amazing work by bringing in the Norse god Thor and his folklore into the Marvel series universe back again in 1962. If they had done a good job, they would have been put behind the bars actually, because the Norse myths are filled with scenes of murder, weird sex, mayhem, almost all of which isn’t really publishable today. So these were all the reasons as to how Thor God of Thunder in Norse Mythology differs from Thor depicted in Marvel's Cinematic Universe.